All Posts By

admin

Chia Seed Pudding

Yum
Jump to Recipe

Chia, it’s not just for plants! My first exposure to chia seeds, aside from the plants that you used to see everywhere, was in a drink. It was this gelatinous goop that was supposed to deliver these amazing health benefits but was the most disgusting thing to swallow. It’s true, chia seeds, despite their smallness pack a pretty nutrient rich punch. So, I revisited them after finding this recipe posted by a fellow blogger. The thing with chia, when you soak it, it does form a gelatinous texture. But, when you’re not drinking it, it can be really good. This particular recipe mixes it with full fat coconut milk, so it’s actually rather filling and very refreshing. I first tried this over the summer, finding it easiest to transport and lighter which I tend to prefer when it’s hotter outside. I paired mine with mixed berries, some shredded coconut and additional syrup. Although I used berries in mine, you could literally do anything. It’s such a basic – and I mean that as a compliment – you could easily use granola, apples, apple butter, jams, honestly anything. I went for an additional antioxidant boost. It’s the easiest thing to whip up, just mix and let it sit overnight. It keeps fresh for 3 days, so you get a couple snacks/breakfasts out of it.

Chia Seed Pudding

Servings 2

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup chia seeds
  • 1 13.5 oz can coconut milk, full fat
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • pinch of coarse salt
  • dash of vanilla extract
  • Toppings like fresh fruit, shredded coconut, maple syrup

Instructions

  1. Combine the chia seeds, coconut milk, honey, salt, vanilla extract in a medium bowl. Whisk ingredients together. Cover and refrigerate at least 8 hours. After 8 hours, the pudding will be set and can store in an airtight container for up to 3 days. Top each serving with anything you would like. 

Recipe Notes

Recipe from Everyday Annie

Vegetable Soup with Basil Pistou

Yum
Jump to Recipe

Anyone else missing snow? No? Living in New England, I am seriously disappointed that it has not snowed yet this winter. It hasn’t even been terribly cold, but nonetheless I’m craving cozy meals that are pretty easy to whip up. One of my favorite cold weather foods is soup. So many flavor options and it keeps very well. With the Holiday season behind us, I was in the mood for something warm and full of flavor, but not overly heavy. This soup was all of the above. Since it’s packed with veggies it’s hearty and satisfying. The basil pistou is a must for this recipe. Pistou is a cold sauce, very similar to pesto, but lacking the pine nuts. It’s perfect for soups, or even spread on a sandwich if you wanted to kick up your sandwich making game. The whole thing comes together fairly quickly. I made some modifications to the recipe which I felt helped round out the flavor a little better. Also, depending on the time of year you make the soup, you may opt for more fresh veggies vs, canned, though if you want to use canned or frozen here, I think it would work very well. The recipe here uses fresh veggies, but it would be easy to adjust.

Print Recipe

Vegetable Soup with Basil Pistou

Ingredients

For the pistou

  • ½ cup fresh basil leaves
  • ½ cup Parmesan cheese grated
  • 1/3 cup evoo
  • 1 garlic clove smashed

For the soup

  • 1 tbsp evoo
  • 1 leek white and green parts only, halved lengthwise and sliced (wash well!)
  • 1 rib celery sliced
  • 1 carrot peeled and sliced
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 3 garlic cloves minced
  • dash of red pepper flakes
  • 3 cups vegetable broth
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 cup pasta like ditalini
  • 8 oz. green beans trimmed and cut into ¼ inch pieces
  • 1 15 oz can of cannellini beans drained and rinsed
  • 1 small zucchini halved and slices
  • 1 15 oz can diced tomato in juice

Instructions

  1. To make the pistou, combine the basil, Parmesan, oil, and garlic in the bowl of your food processor. Process until smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed.
  2. To make the soup, heat the oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. Add in the leeks, celery, carrot. Season with salt. Cook until the vegetables are softened, about 8-10 minutes. Stir in the garlic and red pepper flakes and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir the broth and water into the mixture and simmer for about 20 minutes.
  3. Stir in the pasta and cook until slightly softened, about 8-10 minutes – depending on the pasta you use. Stir in the green beans, cannellini beans, zucchini, and diced tomatoes, with their juice. Simmer until the vegetables are tender, about 6-8 minutes. Season generously with salt and pepper. To serve, top each individual portion with a healthy spoonful of pistou.

Recipe Notes

Barely adapted from Everyday Annie

 

Kale and Sunflower Seed Pesto

Yum
Jump to Recipe

I feel like Lamb Chop. I’ve been singing “this is the cold that never ends. Yes it goes on and on my friend”! We have been sick since Christmas and I am ready for this virus to get a move on. I have not had a huge appetite, but this pasta has been a staple. Mainly because the leftovers are amazing. It’s also a really refreshing pasta. It’s a change to the normal pesto because you’re using kale and sunflower seeds. Now, I’m not one of those people who would stick a kale sticker to their car publicly and regularly proclaiming my love for it. It’s fine, when cooked right (roasted with oil, salt, and pepper until it’s so crisp you forget you’re eating kale – or hidden in a smoothie), and this recipe does it right.

I think the basil is what really reduces that over the top kale flavor. The toasted garlic and the roasted sunflower seeds sort of close the flavor triangle, so it’s a balanced sauce. Not to mention it’s the easiest sauce to pull together. It all comes together in the amount of time it takes to boil the pasta. Speaking of pasta, I used whole wheat. I have terrible memories of eating whole wheat pasta in my Weight Watchers days, when I could eat a decent serving for minimal points and then try not to cry as I wait for my next snack (God that was horrible). It just did not taste good to me. But I rallied, not because I’m doing Weight Watchers, that ship has long sailed away and I’m focused on a healthier diet free lifestyle, but because I thought the whole wheat would honestly taste better here, and it did. It’s certainly not going to break the recipe if you choose to use another pasta type, *ahem* tortellini. I think that would pair quite nicely.

Print Recipe

Kale and Sunflower Seed Pesto

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup roasted sunflower seeds
  • 2 cloves garlic peel intact
  • 2 cups packed kale stems removed
  • 1 cup packed fresh basil leaves
  • 3/4 cup Parmesan cheese grated
  • 1/3 cup EVOO
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 lb whole wheat pasta or pasta of choice

Instructions

  1. Prepare the pasta according to package instructions
  2. Meanwhile, in a medium skillet, warm the sunflower seeds over medium heat. Keep an eye on them so they don’t burn. Toss occasionally to get them freshly roasted. Add the to the bowl of your food processor. Place the garlic cloves in the pan, and toast until lightly browned, turning to make sure all sides are toasted. Move aside to let cool.
  3. Add the kale, basil, cheese, red pepper flakes and peeled garlic to the bowl with the sunflower seeds. Pulse until finely ground, scraping down the sides as needed. With the processor running, pour the olive oil through the feed tube until incorporated. Transfer to a bowl and season with salt and pepper.
  4. When the pasta is done, drain, reserving about 1/2 cup of liquid. Return the pasta to the pan and pour in the pesto. Add reserved pasta water to thin as needed. (I actually omitted this step and left the pesto thick, for me it was perfect.) Season with additional salt and pepper as needed. Serve with additional Parm.

Recipe Notes

NOTES Recipe barely adapted from Everyday Annie.

Homemade Hummus

Yum

Let’s talk hummus. I feel like you love it or hate it. I hated it for the longest time. At some point during my adulting I decided to circle back and give it another shot. So we dated a bit, and I quickly realized not all hummus is created equal. I found a brand in the store that I liked, so I would typically go with it. Then I had a homemade hummus that was so amazing I swear it could have been life altering. It might have also been the fresh bread that was paired with it, who knows, whatever it was this hummus was amazing. It turned me into a lover. I recently made my own pita bread, so I decided to go all out and make my own hummus. Kinda like a peas and carrots scenario, they just go so well together.  I usually dunk some carrots into it and call it a day, but when you have homemade pita, you go with pita.

Now, tahini to me is like parsley or cilantro, I’m not a lover, but I wouldn’t call myself a hater either. Done right, it can add some really good flavor. For me tahini adds just another level of flavor in hummus, but I think that you could omit it entirely. If you did, I would suggest substituting for fire roasted peppers that you combine with some oil, or perhaps roasted garlic that you combine with oil. You would get the same smoother texture but a different element of flavor. If you want to keep with the same flavor, just combine with some plain Greek yogurt.

Homemade Hummus

Homemade Hummus

Instructions

  1. Combine the lemon juice and water in a small bowl and set aside. In a separate bowl, combine the tahini and 2 tbsp of oil. Set aside 2 tbso of chickpeas for garnish.
  2. In your food processor, process the remaining chickpeas, garlic, salt, cumin, and cayenne for about 15 seconds, or until mostly combined. Scrape down the bowl with a rubber spatula. With the machine running, add the lemon/water mixture in a steady stream. Scrape down the bowl and continue to process for 1 more minute. Next, add the tahini/oil mixture. With the machine running, pour it in a steady stream through the food tube. Continue to process until the mixture is smooth, scraping down the sides as needed.
  3. Transfer hummus to a serving bowl, sprinkle with reserved chickpeas and a drizzle of oil. Add a dash of fresh parsley, cover and chill for about 30 minutes. Serve with veggies and/or warm pita bread.

Notes

Recipe from Everyday Annie.

Sushi Bowl

Yum

Happy New Year friends! 2019 is sure to be fantastic. I have a lot planned for this month and this year. But – small steps. One of my goals is to be more regular with my posts. So, I’m starting off 2019 with a new post!

I’m not sure about you, but I basically ate my way through the Holidays like Buddy the Elf. It was a fantastic way to celebrate the end of the year. Particularly a year that I was more than ready to say adios to #byefelicia. But, here we are, the beginning of a fresh 365 days, I’m sick with a cold that I’ve had since before Christmas (remnants of 2018 I suppose – go away!) and my body is desperately asking for something that is not made with just sugar.

I know so many people kick off the New Year with a goal for a “new you” or a new diet that you want to try. I am not going to be posting anything here about diet tricks, or diet foods, or anything like that. I think that everyone is worthy of celebrating, and worthy of love just as they are. If you want a cookie, eat it. There will be so much less guilt. But, if you want something that includes delicious flavors then I’ve got you covered.

This recipe came from a colleague and friend, who was simply walking by with her lunch and I about died because it looked and smelled delicious. I begged for the recipe which she very kindly shared. I then misplaced the recipe…. because my desk usually ends up a pile of papers. Sort of like the way driers eat socks….I swear my desk eats paper. But, I found it! When I was testing this recipe out, I tossed in some different veggies for more crunch. I really liked the combination, plus the added nutrients from all the veggies. Celebrating veggies aside, the secret is really in the sauce. I am a lover of soy sauce, so this soy sauce based liquid gold is worthy of bottling up and storing for basically anything you want to put sauce on. Since this is a sushi bowl, the main grain is rice. I used white rice, but brown rice would be a great substitute. You could also mix grains if you wanted to.

Sushi Bowl

Sushi Bowl

Preparation:
20 min
Cooking:
35 min
Ready in:
55 min

Instructions

  1. To make the dressing, combine the olive oil, sesame oil, maple syrup, soy sauce, rice vinegar and ginger in a mason jar. Shake together to combine.

  2. Place the shrimp into a bowl, season with salt and pepper. Pour over about 1/2 of the dressing over the shrimp and set aside to marinate while you cook the rice.

  3. Cook the rice, or grain of choice, according to the package instructions - or your preferred method.
  4. When the rice is just about finished, heat some olive oil in a skillet over medium high heat. Once the skillet is hot, add the shrimp and liquid to the skillet. Cook until the shrimp is pink and cooked through, taking care not to overcook.
  5. To assemble to bowls, divide the rice between two bowls. Add half of the cucumber, avocado, carrot, radishes and cooked shrimp to each bowl. Pour remaining, reserved, dressing over each bowl.

Notes

I’m not sure where the original recipe came from, but it was titled “sushi undressed”. I’ve modified the recipe to double the dressing, added more vegetables, and omitted some other items.